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Professors show off unique talents

As a way for students to interact outside of the classroom with professors, Legends of Notre Dame hosted the fourth annual ‘Professors Unplugged’ event Tuesday night. This event gives freshmen a chance to see their professors’ unique talents. ND Ignite, a program in the First Year of Studies, organized this year’s event to increase interaction between professors and freshmen, professor and event coordinator Sean Wernert said. “We planned and worked with them [the students] to make the event something that they can be proud of and informative,” Wernert said. “As we continue the event each year, we work with first-year students to remake and design the event as something that they will find interesting.” “We want students to see the path that professors have taken in their careers – what brought them to their chosen academic field and how they got to Notre Dame,” Wernert said. “We also want students and faculty to interact outside the classroom in an informal environment.” Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, kicked off the event by reading three personally written poems. The first of those poems, entitled ‘First Book,’ stressed the importance of embracing and examining self. “We are the first book we are ever given, but the one we read last and least attentively,” Page said. Following Dean Page, Abby Palko, professor of gender studies, chronicled her journey to Notre Dame, which included an eight-year stint as an 8th grade teacher. “When I finally went to Notre Dame for my Ph.D after teaching I couldn’t believe I was being paid to read,” Palko said. “It was incredible.” Many of the professors revealed musical talents. Professors Annie Coleman and Josh Kaplan performed a duet together with an ukelele and a trumpet. Sociology professor Eugene Halton impressed with his harmonica playing skills. His music style was varied, ranging from Beethoven on a miniature harmonica to train sounds on a traditional harmonica. Between songs, Halton recalled his time at Princeton as a track and field athlete and the road that led him to Notre Dame. Others, such as Professor Anre Venter, amused the crowd with wit and sarcasm. “My talent is to use ridicule and sarcasm as the basis for good teaching,” Venter said. “It is always done with love and respect.” Students who attended the event said they felt the event was a success. “I’m really glad I went,” freshman Sophie Loftus said. “They were all really talented and had great life stories.” Contact Drew Pangraze at [email protected],As a way for students to interact outside of the classroom with professors, Legends of Notre Dame hosted the fourth annual ‘Professors Unplugged’ event Tuesday night. This event gives freshmen a chance to see their professors’ unique talents. ND Ignite, a program in the First Year of Studies, organized this year’s event to increase interaction between professors and freshmen, professor and event coordinator Sean Wernert said. “We planned and worked with them [the students] to make the event something that they can be proud of and informative,” Wernert said. “As we continue the event each year, we work with first-year students to remake and design the event as something that they will find interesting.” “We want students to see the path that professors have taken in their careers – what brought them to their chosen academic field and how they got to Notre Dame,” Wernert said. “We also want students and faculty to interact outside the classroom in an informal environment.” Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, kicked off the event by reading three personally written poems. The first of those poems, entitled ‘First Book,’ stressed the importance of embracing and examining self. “We are the first book we are ever given, but the one we read last and least attentively,” Page said. Following Dean Page, Abby Palko, professor of gender studies, chronicled her journey to Notre Dame, which included an eight-year stint as an 8th grade teacher. “When I finally went to Notre Dame for my Ph.D after teaching I couldn’t believe I was being paid to read,” Palko said. “It was incredible.” Many of the professors revealed musical talents. Professors Annie Coleman and Josh Kaplan performed a duet together with an ukelele and a trumpet. Sociology professor Eugene Halton impressed with his harmonica playing skills. His music style was varied, ranging from Beethoven on a miniature harmonica to train sounds on a traditional harmonica. Between songs, Halton recalled his time at Princeton as a track and field athlete and the road that led him to Notre Dame. Others, such as Professor Anre Venter, amused the crowd with wit and sarcasm. “My talent is to use ridicule and sarcasm as the basis for good teaching,” Venter said. “It is always done with love and respect.” Students who attended the event said they felt the event was a success. “I’m really glad I went,” freshman Sophie Loftus said. “They were all really talented and had great life stories.” Contact Drew Pangraze at [email protected],As a way for students to interact outside of the classroom with professors, Legends of Notre Dame hosted the fourth annual ‘Professors Unplugged’ event Tuesday night. This event gives freshmen a chance to see their professors’ unique talents. ND Ignite, a program in the First Year of Studies, organized this year’s event to increase interaction between professors and freshmen, professor and event coordinator Sean Wernert said. “We planned and worked with them [the students] to make the event something that they can be proud of and informative,” Wernert said. “As we continue the event each year, we work with first-year students to remake and design the event as something that they will find interesting. “We want students to see the path that professors have taken in their careers – what brought them to their chosen academic field and how they got to Notre Dame,” Wernert said. “We also want students and faculty to interact outside the classroom in an informal environment.” Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, kicked off the event by reading three personally written poems. The first of those poems, entitled ‘First Book,’ stressed the importance of embracing and examining self. “We are the first book we are ever given, but the one we read last and least attentively,” Page said. Following Dean Page, Abby Palko, professor of gender studies, chronicled her journey to Notre Dame, which included an eight-year stint as an 8th grade teacher. “When I finally went to Notre Dame for my Ph.D after teaching I couldn’t believe I was being paid to read,” Palko said. “It was incredible.” Many of the professors revealed musical talents. Professors Annie Coleman and Josh Kaplan performed a duet together with an ukelele and a trumpet. Sociology professor Eugene Halton impressed with his harmonica playing skills. His music style was varied, ranging from Beethoven on a miniature harmonica to train sounds on a traditional harmonica. Between songs, Halton recalled his time at Princeton as a track and field athlete and the road that led him to Notre Dame. Others, such as Professor Anre Venter, amused the crowd with wit and sarcasm. “My talent is to use ridicule and sarcasm as the basis for good teaching,” Venter said. “It is always done with love and respect.” Students who attended the event said they felt the event was a success. “I’m really glad I went,” freshman Sophie Loftus said. “They were all really talented and had great life stories.” Contact Drew Pangraze at [email protected] read more

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Saint Mary’s hosts annual Sophomore Parents Weekend

first_imgSaint Mary’s sophomores did not have to wait until fall break to unite with their families this year, as the College hosted its annual Sophomore Parents Weekend on Friday and Saturday.Sophomore Olivia Bentley said she enjoyed the tailgate and watch party, since it allowed her friends and parents to familiarize themselves with one another.“My favorite part was cheering on the Fighting Irish with my parents and fellow Belles,” Bentley said.Sophomore Nicole Popow said she got to spend quality time catching up with her mom, and she enjoyed the chance to talk face-to-face. “I enjoyed just being able to sit down and talk with my mom in person about things that have been going on in our lives,” Popow said.Bentley, who is from Baltimore, said she thinks parents weekends are valuable because she does not see her family often.“I think it’s very important to see my parents and family as much as possible,” she said. “Parents weekend allows me to stay connected with them and is a good excuse for them to come visit me here in South Bend.”Popow said Sophomore Parents Weekend also offered students a chance to show their families where they live during the school year. She said her mom enjoyed seeing where Popow spends most of her time.Bentley said she enjoyed showing her family her dorm room and the South Bend community. “I think being able to spend time with our family on Saint Mary’s campus is important because they are able to see the hard work we are putting in here,” she said.Sophomore Caitlyn Gibbs said she enjoyed reuniting with her family at her home away from home.“It’s hard being away from your family for so long, so any opportunity to see them is a blessing,” she said. “It also is a way for parents to show their support of their daughters’ college education. College is difficult, and it is always nice to be reminded that you have people in your corner.”Tags: Baltimore, parents, Sophomore Parents Weekend, tailgatelast_img read more

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​Why credit-card hackers love America

first_imgby: Aimee PicchiIf you live in America and use plastic to make purchases, chances are you’ve been alerted to fraudulent activity on your account.America is now the favorite haunt of credit-card fraudsters, with a report from Barclays finding that 47 percent of all global card fraud affects cards issued to U.S. residents, even though the U.S. only represents 24 percent of card volume, according to Quartz. Barclays didn’t immediately return a request for comment.While some might suspect Americans have a target painted on the back of their credit cards because they live in a rich country, there’s actually a technical issue that’s attracting criminals. The U.S. lags other countries in its rollout of cards that are designed to stymie fraud. Most American credit cards still rely on magnetic strips, which are easy to copy, while Europe and other regions have moved forward with chip-and-pin cards, also known as EMV cards, which stands for Europay, MasterCard and Visa.EMV cards include embedded microchips that store customer data, which is considered more secure because retailers and card processors don’t store the card data in their systems. With magnetic strip cards, the card number is released to the retailer, which is why so many American retailers — from Target (TGT) to Staples (SPLS) — have been hit by hackers in the last few years. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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In comedy and in credit unions – delivery makes all the difference

first_imgI’m a big fan of podcasts – I listen to them, I make them, I study them, I even read books about them—and I learn a ton by listening to them. Podcast are a great content channel, and I’m glad more are being made each day. I hope your credit union sees the value in producing one for its members. But I can’t listen to podcasts while I work and there are many times when I don’t want content or information in audio format. If I’m searching for a quick answer, I just need an article I can scan. Other times I need to learn and see how to do something, so a quick video tutorial is the best way to deliver the information I seek.Why do my personal content digestion preferences matter? Because everyone has them, and if your credit union is putting out content, and spending time, resources and money on creating what you know will benefit your members, you’re only half-valuable unless you think about where they are physically and mentally when you deliver it to them.Even with a limited marketing / content development team and budget, the best way for your organization to effectively deliver valuable content is to have a diversity of delivery options. This isn’t to say every time you have a campaign to execute, you need a blog post, a podcast, a video, an engagement contest, a news release, a pitch to local media, and ten other methods for getting your content out. But you should have a menu of options you’re skilled at producing and pick the method that best matches the content and the strategic timing of delivery. Then think like your audience and imagine where they are in their lives and days when your content might float across their attentions.Let’s see a sample of what this looks like. On your content calendar this month (you have one, right?!) you are planning to deliver content related to:personal finance education seriesnew product launch/updatemembership drive and community eventshousing market / economic updatesYou might want to align your content, delivery channel and timing as such:Financial education: Podcast: Released on Fridays on website, shared via social throughout weekend.New product launch: News release, media pitch, newsletter/direct mailing to members: Released on Monday morning.Membership drive/event: Video of member testimonials, Infographic of community impact stats: Released 7-10 days prior to event, shared on social media in evenings.Housing market news: Interview with expert source, audio and video format: Shared via email to members with loans, around noon on Wednesday. There is an art and a science to matching content with delivery and timing, so closely measuring results, learning what combinations work best, repeating and re-examining often is vital for success with your specific audience.Here at Filene, we are going through a similar journey. At our core, we are a research organization and in that way, our research is our product. When a new research report is ready, we have so much love and passion for it that the first thing we want to do is blast it out in full 100-page PDF glory to everyone in the world. But we’re getting savvier about segmenting who in our audience would most appreciate that delivery method (the likes of Andrew Downin, for one!) versus when the research is better suited for delivery via a short-form executive summary, or presentation deck of main findings, or an infographic visually representing key results, or an interactive microsite with quizzes, or multimedia storytelling with audio clips, video interviews, and written descriptions. And the timing of when the report needs to be released will help drive those strategic delivery decisions and vise-versa.  At the end of a day’s worth of content consumption, I am full and exhausted, but better for the knowledge I’ve gained if the delivery channels met my needs. The founder of viral content website Upworthy, Peter Koechley, spoke recently at an event I attended about what it took to create content that engages 50 million people monthly. He reminded us that whatever we’re doing, we’re not just vying for attention or market share against others doing the same thing as us. The reality of the world we live in today is that no matter who we are if we have a message to tell, we’re all essentially ‘Kompeting with the Kardashians.’ May your message survive its journey and safely reach its destination. 19SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Holly Fearing Holly lives and breathes social media; if you can’t find her IRL, try reaching out on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or Instagram, and you’ll likely get her right away. … Web: www.filene.org Detailslast_img read more

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Robbery suspect killed attempting to flee across Miami expressway

first_imgA robbery suspect was killed on Friday morning after he fled from a vehicle and attempted to cross State Road 112 in Miami.The man, who has not been identified, was being chased by cops after they noticed a robbery in progress at N.W. 49 Street and N.W. 28 Avenue and moved in to nab the suspect.When the police attempted to stop the vehicle but the suspect refused to yield, exited the vehicle and fled on foot. As he attempted to cross the Expressway, he was struck by a taxi cab and died on the spot.The robbery victim and the taxi driver were not injured.last_img

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Cycling: Greater Accra Chairman Kofi Boakye eyes presidential seat

first_imgGreater Accra Cycling Federation Chairman Kofi Boakye says he will contest the incumbent Mohammed Sahnoon in the upcoming Presidential elections.The Cycling Federation has been saddled with few controversies recently and Kofi Boakye who has been following the sport and contributing in different ways thinks the association needs a new direction.Mr Boakye in an exclusive interview with Joy Sports hinted the time has come for cycling to take a complete resurgence by making it successful as he mapped up strategies to help the sports thrive as well as achieving laurels on the international scene.“Expect a complete 360 degree turn, we are going to take up proper management and packaging and an effective presentation of the sport in Ghana.“There are so many opportunities that has to be filed and my team is ready to accomplish the huge task that confronts the sport in the country,’’ he noted.Mr Boakye further mentioned the retrogression of the sport in recent times considering the vast potential. “We would be looking to make a mark in cycling because Ghanaians are not mean achievers. We always do better and become the best in every endeavour. But for cycling, the excuses are just too many and we are tired of that.“We are now in to perform and get results and show the trophies as well as capitalizing on the business aspect,’’ he said.He added: “We look forward in improving the fund base of the federation and that’s where the business aspect of the sport comes in and we would think through the various opportunities to improve our financial base.’’Mr Boakye envisages a 2024 vision where Ghana would be one of the powerhouses in cycling.“We all saw what happened to the cycling team that went to Commonwealth Games in Australia and sincerely it would be very difficult for us to make an impact in Tokyo and it will certainly be a miracle if we to make an impact. The elections will be held this year.last_img read more

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Making South Africa truly modern

first_imgJP LandmanIn conversations, the same sentiment is repeated over and over, whether around the supper or breakfast table or when answering an opinion poll: South Africa is in decline. Eskom, xenophobia, crime, the poor economy, political uncertainty … we are going downhill fast. Many prefer to leave the country. Those in the know talk of a sixth wave of emigration. The first happened in 1948. The fifth wave occurred just before and after 1993.The mood is not about to lift miraculously either, it seems.Political uncertainty will remain for a year or more. Elections for a new dispensation are still months away. Afterwards, the newly elected still have to find their feet. To make matters worse, some of those elected may be found wanting.While political divide and confusion reign supreme, the world economy, like the local one, is slowing down.Can South Africa escape this sticky, despondent situation?The country experienced a major change in circumstances following 1994, leapfrogging from a traditional society to a modern one. Seen in context, this change is part of a much bigger picture, a much longer continuum.It started off slow enough. One hundred and fifty years after Jan van Riebeeck first set foot on South African soil “…the (Cape) Colony contained one town worthy of the name and five or six little villages,” writes CW de Kiewit in his classic 1941 work, A History of South Africa. Using the dry language of his economic-historical perspective, he paints a picture of the Cape becoming lame because of “deficieny in consumption, activity and animation” and how the Cape “built … its capital slowly”.South Africa really only emerged as a modern society with the discovery and mining of diamonds in the 1860s, and gold in the 1886s. And following this, the institutions which came about as a result of mining became the bedrock for modern South Africa. By comparison, Harvard University was established 200 years before South Africa got its first university college, and 16 years before van Riebeeck arrived in the Cape – a sobering thought.Modernisation was further stunted with the exclusion of black people from the process of participation. From the time that Cecil Rhodes passed the Glen Grey Act in 1894, it took exactly 100 years for South Africa to become democratic.Martin Meredith quotes Rhodes in his address to the Cape parliament, where he motivated the act as follows: “It must be brought home to them [black people] that in future nine-tenths of them will have to spend their lives in manual labour…”The country’s slow start and the economic exclusion of the majority have brought us to today. Our generation are left with three tasks: to establish a democracy which includes everyone; to build a modern economy whose growth exceeds that of the population; and address the enormous disparities by eroding the social imbalances which still exists among the previously disadvantaged.The two aforementioned tasks have largely been achieved. Despite showing only 3% economic growth this year, it remains higher than the population growth and is still more than the 1% with which we had to satisfy ourselves for almost two decades. But, other critical issues still need to be addressed – the attack on the judicial system should be averted, and economic growth needs to remain a political priority. Then, social development can follow.Seen in this light, the current pessimism is a good thing. It may be the cause of much disgruntlement, but it also creates the opportunity for creativity and energy.We hear of groups of citizens getting together, as was the case during the apartheid years, to discuss the state of affairs and the direction the country is going. Growing concern and general discontent with political parties are increasingly voiced.That’s how we will escape the sticky situation. We need to loose our naivety. Change will not come easy. To be truly modern is not just about suffrage, about easy reconciliations. What we have to behold is the enormous challenge of social development. And decide from what moral foundation we want to approach the current situation – and then live these values.Just maybe, a new generation is born out of this situation – a generation intent on making South Africa truly modern. A generation no longer crying over spilt milk.JP Landman is a self-employed political and trend analyst. He consults to SA largest private wealth business, BoE Private Clients, and works with several SA corporates on future scenario trends. His focus areas are trends in politics, economics and social capital.Among some of the unique research projects his consultancy has undertaken was the role of public institutions in battling corruption (quoted by the UN in a report on corruption), the interplay of demographics and economic growth, and an overview of trends around poverty alleviation in SA. Whilst working as an analyst on the JSE in the 1990s he was voted the top analyst in political trends.He is also a popular speaker who has addressed diverse audiences locally and internationally and enjoys consistently good ratings.He has a BA and LLB degrees from Stellenbosch (1978), studied Economics and Development Economics at Unisa (1979 and 1980) and later at Harvard (1998 and 2005), and obtained an MPhil in Future Studies (cum laude) from Stellenbosch (2003).last_img read more

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World Cup off to colourful start

first_img12 June 2010More than 84 000 people witnessed the dawn of a new chapter in South Africa’s history when the 2010 Fifa World Cup kicked off in true African style at Johannesburg’s Soccer City Stadium on Friday.From as early as 09h00, excited Mexican and South African football supporters started making their way to the “football calabash” just outside Soweto in anticipation of what was to come.Despite the early morning cold, fans were in a festive mood as the Mexican “Matraca” (a wooden accessory that makes noise when rotated) met the South African vuvuzela in a test of noise.It wasn’t long, however, before these supporters got to see Africa’s most magnificent stadium when gates opened at 10h30.And following a magnificent opening ceremony which showcased the music and culture of Africa, fans were treated to an exciting opening encounter which ended 1-1 at full time.The atmosphere in the stadium matched that which has been seen on the streets of South African cities in the build-up to 11 June.Speaking Danny Jordaan, CEO of the Local Organising Committee, thanked South Africans and visitors to the country for their unbelievable support after the match.“We couldn’t have asked for more,” Jordaan said. “A capacity stadium, a host nation with a will to win, an incredible atmosphere and spectacular football. It is just fantastic that the first goal of Africa’s first World Cup went to South Africa, we really couldn’t have written a better script.”Before the first game of the tournament got going, South African president Jacob Zuma addressed the 84 490 strong crowd, conveying a message from former president Nelson Mandela, who tragically lost his great-granddaughter in a car accident on Thursday night.“Let me convey a message from Madiba, our icon, who wanted to come and greet you before the start of the match, but unfortunately his family was hit by a tragedy. He said: ‘The game must start, you must enjoy the game.’“We as a country, we are humbled by this opportunity,” Zuma said. “Africa is indeed happy. This is the African World Cup. The time for Africa has come, it has arrived, Ke Nako.”Zuma then officially opened the 2010 Fifa World Cup.Jordaan was not the only one who was impressed with the atmosphere inside Soccer City.Julio Mendez, who hails from Mexico City, said he was impressed by the number of Bafana Bafana supporters who had come out to support their team. “The stadium is very impressive and the atmosphere is perfect; it’s more yellow than we expected it to be!”Adina Neumann, also from Mexico City, said the din in Soccer City was nothing new to Mexican football supporters. “Everything is great, the people are very friendly and the game was very entertaining. The vuvuzelas are fine. You think Mexicans aren’t use to the noise? We are noisier!”Despite the draw, Bafana Bafana supporters were still happy.Johannesburg resident Nlandie Nel said: “It was an excellent day. The stadium is superb, and Bafana’s performance was very impessive.”Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

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