Tag: 上海419龙凤会所

Homeless man ’emotionally exhausted’ by life on the streets

first_imgWATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Advertisement Twitter Email Linkedin Previous articleAustria tourists Shannon boundNext articleAnd Still, We Work Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live NewsLocal NewsHomeless man ’emotionally exhausted’ by life on the streetsBy Alan Jacques – October 8, 2015 839 center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Vedran Kohut a homeless man and his dog in their former camp near Westfields.By Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Vedran Kohut a homeless man and his dog in their former camp near Westfields.A HOMELESS Croatian man living rough on the streets of Limerick feels he has been left behind by society and now feels “emotionally exhausted” by the experience.Vedran Kohut and his canine companion, Evelyn, have slept in 29 cities across Europe since 2013. The 36-year-old arrived in Limerick in March 2015 and had, for a time, been living in a makeshift camp along the banks of the River Shannon.In the last three years, Vedran and his faithful companion have been homeless in France, Switzerland, Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Austria, Slovenia, Italy and Bosnia and Herzegovina.Since arriving in Limerick, he claims that none of Limerick’s homeless shelters would accommodate his pet, which he refers to as a therapy dog to help him deal with his mental health issues. He told the Limerick Post that he has been attacked and had his tent burnt down during his time in the city, which lead to a breakdown and a period in hospital.“I was doing my best to keep myself healthy, mentally and physically. I feel I have been completely left behind by some public services, especially when I was dealing with the council’s homeless team,” Vedran said.“I am now emotionally exhausted and probably in need of another recovery period in hospital. I only managed to get a little bit of work since March, mostly because nobody would employ me with my current situation. I have had to borrow money from family and friends and I have been living for at least six months with less than €5 a day in my pocket.”Earlier this year, Vedran had his passport and other documents and valuables including a laptop stolen while travelling by train from Galway to Dublin. He now feels desperate, is in need of support, and does not know where to turn.“I am grateful for all the help I have received from people in Limerick but what I really need is to be treated fairly by public services such as the social welfare office,” he concluded. Facebook TAGSAlan JacqueshomelesshomelessnesslimerickVedran Kohut Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Print WhatsApplast_img read more

Start reading Homeless man ’emotionally exhausted’ by life on the streets

Trump threatens to ‘close down’ social media after his tweets tagged

first_imgOn Tuesday, Twitter for the first time prompted readers to check the facts in tweets sent by US President Donald Trump, warning his claims about mail-in ballots were false and had been debunked by fact checkers. US President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to close down social media platforms after Twitter labelled two of his tweets “unsubstantiated” and accused him of making false claims.”Republicans feel that Social Media Platforms totally silence conservatives voices. We will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen,” Trump tweeted. Topics : In a tweet responding to the company’s move, Trump accused the company of interfering in the 2020 presidential election. “Twitter is completely stifling FREE SPEECH, and I, as President, will not allow it to happen!” he said.The blue exclamation mark notification prompted readers to “get the facts about mail-in ballots” and directed them to a page with news articles and information about the claims aggregated by Twitter staffers.Trump pushed back again on Wednesday saying “we can’t let large scale Mail-In Ballots take root in our Country. It would be a free for all on cheating, forgery and the theft of Ballots.”Whoever cheated the most would win. Likewise, Social Media. Clean up your act, NOW!!!!” The president also accused social media platforms of interfering in the last election, saying “we saw what they attempted to do, and failed, in 2016.””We can’t let a more sophisticated version of that happen again.”The president has long used Twitter as a platform to spread abuse, conspiracy theories, false information and insults to his 80 million followers.Before being elected in 2016, he built his political brand by supporting the “birther” lie that Barack Obama, America’s first black president, was not born in the United States and therefore was not eligible to be president.And he has recently ignited another storm with an attempted character assassination of MSNBC TV host Joe Scarborough by spreading the baseless rumor he murdered an aide.last_img read more

Start reading Trump threatens to ‘close down’ social media after his tweets tagged

IAPF offers tacit endorsement of compulsory saving, collective DC

first_imgThe Irish Association of Pension Funds (IAPF) has tacitly endorsed a mandatory pension system as the least complex and costly reform option if the current government wishes to boost participation rates.The industry body also suggested that a shift towards an auto-enrolment or a compulsory pension savings system could warrant the launch of collective defined contribution (CDC) funds, and said government should let the private sector operate any scheme unless it felt the need for a provider of last resort.In its response to the Universal Retirement Savings Group (URSG), which launched an informal consultation with stakeholder groups following its launch in February, the IAPF did not explicitly endorse a mandatory system and said it accepted the “political reality” that auto-enrolment may be easier to deliver.Despite this admission, the IAPF said complexities arising from an auto-enrolment approach would easily fall away if the government chose compulsion, suggesting there were “clear advantages” to a mandatory system. “Overall, it should be less complex and costly to administer, there is less need for compliance checking and establishing who should be included and when.”The IAPF’s words echoed those chosen by the OECD when it reviewed Ireland’s pension system in 2013.The think tank’s report backed compulsory saving and suggested auto-enrolment was a second-rate policy, with the former a “less costly and more effective” means of increasing coverage.In a letter to the URSG, IAPF chief executive Jerry Moriarty said the association had “some difficulty” in answering the consultation, as it did not set out a clear objective for the proposed Universal Retirement Savings Scheme (URSS).“We believe that if this had been done and the population of likely participants established it would be much easier to look at issues such as operation and investment,” Moriarty said.The response said the Irish government should play no role in operating the URSS outside of regulation, noting the importance of establishing a trusted system, and contrasting this with the government’s 0.6% pensions levy and the use of the National Pensions Reserve Fund to support struggling banks during the financial crisis.“That said, there may be a need for a provider of last resort that would be able to take on low contributions on an uncommercial basis,” the consultation said, in a likely reference to the UK’s launch of the National Employment Savings Trust.The consultation also suggested the reform could see the launch of CDC funds, as these could be more appropriate than individual accounts. “If a collective DC arrangement was established it could provide more equity across generations and therefore more certainty of achieving the desired goals.”The IAPF alos said any investment strategy would need to take an appropriate amount of risk to meet agreed objectives, in an absence of a pre-determined replacement ratio for the URSS.It also argued that there should only be limited investment choice, with a default fund a necessity.Asked about the timeline for its introduction, the IAPF said it preferred a “big bang” approach, allowing for the system to establish scale “sooner, rather than over generations”.The URSG has previously said that it would look to table its proposals by the end of the year, but minister for social protection Joan Burton has not given any indication of when the system would be in place, insisting there would be a “very gradual” rollout once economic factors allowed for the launch.last_img read more

Start reading IAPF offers tacit endorsement of compulsory saving, collective DC

Third-quarter losses wipe out earlier gains for Lithuania’s pension funds

first_imgLithuania’s second and third-pillar pension fund results took a pounding in the third quarter as a result of heavy equity market losses.According to the Bank of Lithuania (BoL), the sector’s regulator, second-pillar nominal losses in the third quarter averaged 4.28%.The five high-risk funds, which can invest up to 100% in equities, posted the highest losses, of 9.27%, followed by the nine medium-risk funds (with equity limits of 50-70%) at 5.36%, and the four low-risk funds (25-30% equity investment) at 1.86%.Only the eight conservative bond funds generated a positive return, of 0.46%. The latest results wiped out the strong growth made earlier in the year by the equity-focused funds, dragging the total year-to-date average down to 0.11%, from 7.55% at the end of the first quarter.Nine-month losses averaged 0.39% for the high-risk funds and 0.27% for the medium-risk ones, compared with gains of 13.28% and 8.52%, respectively, at the end of the first quarter.However, there was a wide variation in performance, with two of the high-risk funds and four of the medium-risk ones making positive returns as of the end of September.The low-risk and conservative funds generated nine-month returns of 0.77% and 0.90%, respectively.Audrius Šilgalis, senior specialist at the financial services and markets analysis division of BoL’s Supervision Service, said: “The sharp decline in stock prices in China’s market and turmoil in the European and global financial markets resulted in the value of a major part of the second-pillar pension funds’ units to decrease in the third quarter.“However, due to a particularly successful beginning of the year, the return on second-pillar pension funds over the nine months of this year is positive.”Over this period, assets continued to grow, by 7.2% to €2bn, due to continuing inflows from contributions.Although the system is voluntary, around 80% of the workforce has signed up.The results for the third-pillar funds were even worse.Third-quarter losses averaged 6.03%, compared with a positive return of 9.16% at the end of March.Losses ranged from 9.34% for the highest equity structures to 4.86% for medium-risk plans and 0.58% for bond/minimal equity funds.For the nine-month period, the three conservative funds generated a small positive average return of 0.66%, while the five high and four medium-risk funds made losses of 1.4% and 0.22%, respectively.Assets over the nine-month period grew by 9.8% to €52.1m, driven by a 13.9% increase in membership.last_img read more

Start reading Third-quarter losses wipe out earlier gains for Lithuania’s pension funds