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Blizzard in Denver! B’way-Bound Frozen to Make World Premiere in Colorado

first_img‘Frozen’ Frozen Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on March 11, 2020center_img View Comments The cold never bothered Colorado anyway! Frozen, the eagerly anticipated stage adaptation of the Oscar-winning hit musical film, will play its out-of-town tryout at the Buell Theatre in the Denver Center for the Performing Arts in August 2017. Directed by Alex Timbers, the previously announced production is scheduled to hit Broadway in Spring 2018, with casting, theater and dates to be announced later.The Disney musical, featuring the beloved tunes (and some new ones) by married songwriting duo Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez and a book by screenwriter Jennifer Lee, will have choreography by Peter Darling.The production has an all-star design team lined up: set and costume designer Bob Crowley, lighting designer Natasha Katz and sound designer Peter Hylenski. Stephen Oremus will serve as music supervisor.Frozen follows two royal sisters, Elsa and Anna, whose relationship is put to the test when Elsa’s magical ice powers are unleashed during a power anthem that you’re still singing under your breath. Also in the mix are a strapping iceman, his reindeer, a fast-talking snowman and a too-good-to-be-true prince. We probably didn’t need to explain that to you.The film won Oscars in 2013 for Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song (for “Let It Go”) and featured the vocal talents of several Broadway favorites, including Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad, Santino Fontana and Kristen Bell.last_img read more

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Mission bankruptcy underscores coal’s long-term decline

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CBS News:A Tennessee coal mining company that filed for bankruptcy this week is the second coal company to go bankrupt during Donald Trump’s pro-coal presidency. It’s also the fifth U.S. coal industry bankruptcy in the last three years as competitors in the energy market continue to drive coal into the dust pile.Mission Coal, an operator of three mines in West Virginia and one in Alabama, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Sunday listing about $175 million in debt and just $55,000 cash on hand, according to court filings. This small company joins Colorado-based Westmoreland Coal, one of the country’s oldest coal companies, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this month, and Peabody Energy, Arch Coal and Alpha Natural Resources, which all have ended up in bankruptcy courts since 2015.Competition from other energy sources—super-cheap natural gas in particular—has been the main culprit. Obama-era “clean coal” regulations scuttled earlier this year by the Trump administration has played just a small role in the industry’s collapse, experts say.“Coal plants have been losing market share just on competitiveness alone, to natural gas, for quite some time–even before the EPA regulations came down that accelerated the shutdown of even more plants,” Greg Reed, director of the Center for Energy and the GRID Institute at the University of Pittsburgh, told CBS MoneyWatch recently.The total stock market value of the country’s four largest coal producers has plunged to $6.3 billion today from $33 billion in 2011. About 62,000 coal miners have lost their jobs during that time. Further job losses will come: More than a quarter of the U.S.’ current fleet of coal plants is projected to shut down over the next 12 years, according to one analysis.More: Mission Coal files for bankruptcy—5th coal company in 3 years Mission bankruptcy underscores coal’s long-term declinelast_img read more

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Lufthansa says up to 26,000 employees at risk of losing jobs

first_imgLufthansa admitted on Wednesday that the positions of up to 26,000 employees are surplus to requirements, suggesting many more jobs will be cut at the German carrier than a figure of more than 10,000 flagged a few weeks ago.Speaking after a meeting with trade unions, a Lufthansa spokeswoman said the airline estimates that it has a surplus of 22,000 full-time equivalent positions or 26,000 employees.Lufthansa last week pledged a wide-ranging restructuring, from thousands of job cuts to asset sales, as it seeks to repay a 9 billion euro (US$10.26 billion) state bailout and navigate deepening losses in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. It said then that job cuts would be “significantly more” than the 10,000 figure it had previously estimated.The company is trying to reach agreement with labour unions to make employees work part-time and other ways to cut personnel costs before it holds an extraordinary general meeting on June 25, when shareholders will vote on the bailout.Flight attendants union UFO demanded that Lufthansa commits to avoiding forced redundancies, but said it was working hard to reach a deal by the time of the meeting.Meanwhile, the union representing pilots said its members had offered to take a cut in pay of up to 45 percent, in total amounting to about 350 million euros, but in return it wants the company to try to secure as many jobs as possible.Topics :last_img read more

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U.S. 50 Closed near Muscatatuck

first_imgJennings County, In. — U.S. Highway 50 is closed at the Muscatatuck Wildlife Refuge due to downed power lines. No other information is available at this time.last_img

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England Golf to support Parliamentary Golf Group

first_img The All-Party Parliamentary Golf Group has announced England Golf as a supporter. The Group, comprising Members of all major political parties and from both Houses of Parliament, has the singular remit to “support the sport of golf.” All-Party Parliamentary Groups do not receive any public funding and are reliant on supporters to enable activities. England Golf is the governing body for all amateur golf in England, representing over 1900 clubs with over 675,000 members. At the heart of grassroots golf, it’s development initiative ‘Get into golf’ introduces new golfers to the game, encouraging participation and lifelong involvement in the game. England Golf also provides business support to clubs to encourage more golfers to enjoy the benefits of club membership, and help promote the game as being accessible, fun and family friendly. Karl McCartney MP, Group Chairman and Member of Parliament for Lincoln, welcomed England Golf’s support. He said “I am pleased to announce that England Golf has agreed to support the All-Party Parliamentary Golf Group. England Golf do a lot of excellent work to encourage participation in the sport, and I hope that with their support, the Group can promote golf as a sport for all.” Nick Pink, Chief Executive of England Golf, commented “we are delighted to support the Parliamentary Golf Group, and look forward to working closely with Members as they seek to support golf at all levels. England Golf works hard to promote grassroots opportunities to play the sport, but challenges remain, and I hope that the Group will be able to help tackle these and ensure a bright future for golf.” For more information on APPG Golf visit their website. 9 May 2016 England Golf to support Parliamentary Golf Group last_img read more

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South Sudan deserved the win: Julius Poloto

first_img Tags: 2019 U23 AFCON QualifiersJulius polototopuganda kobs Poloto (left) was also Captain of the Hippos (file photo)KAMPALA – After Uganda Kob’s shock exit from the 2019 U23 Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) qualifiers at the hands of South Sudan, KCCA FC midfielder Julius Poloto has come out and conceded that they (Kobs) were not good enough in the return leg.The Kobs went into the second leg leading 1-0 but lost 2-0 in Juba on Monday to bow out 2-1 on aggregate.Poloto, through his Facebook page expressed his sadness and apologized for his side’s poor display in Juba.“What a frustrating, sleepless night in Juba, read Poloto’s post on Facebook.“Blame us, shout at us, criticize us but i am also very disappointed about today’s game.“We wanted to achieve a positive result but were not good enough in the 90 minutes and our opponents deserved the win.“Usually i am too angry to post on Social Media after such frustrating days like today but i don’t want this match to go uncommented.“Nevertheless, Ugandans we are sorry especially for the fans who turned up at Juba stadium to see us fighting but we will try everything to bounce back stronger in the next engagement and bounce back from the disappointment we are feeling at the moment.The Kobs became the second National football side to be eliminated in the qualifying rounds of their respective AFCON qualifiers after the Hippos who lost to Cameroon earlier this year.Like several others, Poloto was also part of the Hippos side that lost on penalties to the West Africans in May after drawing 1-1 in 180 minutes.With the Kobs and Hippos failing in their respective bids to reach the finals’ tournaments, a lot of questions have already been raised about how players are groomed in the under age group.Comments last_img read more

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Amazing Body Facts

first_imgThere are more wonders in your body than you can possibly imagine.  Here are half a dozen new findings for conversation starters.Your inner bat:  You have another sense you may not be aware of: you can learn the art of echolocation.   It’s been known that blind people develop an ability to detect objects by their echoes, but Science Daily reported that even sighted people can train themselves to do it.  Some people are better at it than others, for unknown reasons.  Echolocation depends on very precise detection of timing differences between the two ears.Self-healing holes:  Our blood vessels are made of a wonderful tissue, called epithelium.  It’s stretchy, stable, and watertight.  Science Daily says, “Measuring just a few hundred nanometers in thickness, this super-tenuous structure routinely withstands blood flow, hydrostatic pressure, stretch and tissue compression to create a unique and highly dynamic barrier that maintains the organization necessary to partition tissues from the body’s circulatory system.”But there are immune cells, called leukocytes, that need to enter these passageways.  How do they do it?  The article presented findings by the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where scientists studied how epithelial cells cooperate with leukocytes, creating holes for them to enter, then healing the holes behind them.By and large, these ensuing “micro -wounds” are short-lived; as soon as the cells have crossed the endothelium, these pores and gaps quickly heal, restoring the system’s efficient barrier function. In cases when these gaps fail to close — and leakage occurs — the results can be devastating, leading to dramatic pathologies including sepsis and acute lung injury….Described in The Journal of Cell Biology, the new findings suggest that rather than structural robustness per se, the barrier function of the endothelium relies on an enormous self-restorative capacity….“The cell’s restorative capacity was just so striking,” says [Christopher V.] Carman. “But these early investigations were still inadequate to tell us how the breaches were being closed. We had to dig down to the sub-cellular level to understand the underlying activities and the molecular signaling mechanisms that were orchestrating these activities.“Viruses, your friends:  You have another immune system scientists did not realize till recently, and it involves partnership with viruses.  Nature News reported that “Viruses in the gut protect from infection.”  Bacteriophages, tiny viruses that can invade and kill bacteria, find a home among the linings in your airways, by forming bonds with sugars in the mucus.  When bacteria invade, these killing machines, like a robotic army, take them out.  Medical Xpress called this a “new immune system” that has been discovered.  In more general terms, Science Magazine reviewed “our viral inheritance,” giving examples of good and bad ways that viruses interact with our bodies.  Even some endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) that seemed at first to be parasitic on our genomes now appear to be useful or beneficial.Nose knowledge:  The sense of smell continues to be one of the most difficult to understand in humans and in fruit flies.  The molecules that land on olfactory receptors encode messages that are in some ways similar to those in the retina, but there appear to be timing dependences, too, Medical Xpress reported.  Science Magazine reviewed the growing science of “flavor,” trying to understand how we learn to associate smells and tastes with pleasure or displeasure.  “It’s a vastly more complex topic than they once thought,” the article said.Your inner clock: We share a sense with the little flies we swat on our arms: a biological clock.  Because the human circadian clock is much more complex, scientists try to understand the clock in fruit flies.  Medical Xpress reported that a new component of the fruit fly circadian clock has been identified.Six degrees of separation:  Because the brain is so heavily interconnected, any synapse is only about six steps away from any other.  This allows for an enormous amount of plasticity for “rewiring” circuits when one part is damaged.  Science Daily discussed work at UCLA that shows the brain “rewires itself after damage or injury.”  Understanding these processes could lead to therapies for stroke victims and Alzheimer’s patients.  Last week, Science Magazine discussed “Why adults need new brain cells.”  Contrary to beliefs decades ago, neuroscientists now know that brain cell regeneration takes place.  Not only that, “a key function of adult neurogenesis is to shape neuronal connectivity in the brain according to individual needs,” the article said.  Because of the brain’s plasticity and massively parallel architecture, Sandia Labs is looking to the human brain as “a model for supercomputers,” PhysOrg reported.To make a point without attempting to be morbid, these findings underscore why the death of a human being, whether in a tornado or an abortion lab, is such a traumatic thing.  It’s like smashing a supercomputer, destroying a working factory, obliterating a work of art.  A dead body returns to undifferentiated dust that fulfills none of these fantastically complex processes.The Bible describes death as an enemy, the result of sin that infected the planet with a curse and judgment.  The only hope of a new body that can live forever is faith in Jesus Christ, who paved the way for salvation through His death and resurrection (I Corinthians 15).  If you marvel at the body you have now, “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, nor have entered into the heart of man the things which God has prepared for those who love Him”  (I Corinthians 2:9). 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Who Owns Science, Anyway?

first_imgJournal editors are freaking out over the rise of Open Science initiatives, worried their reign over the perception of science is doomed.Who owns science? In the old days, scientists were self-funded or supported by patrons. Nowadays, much of science is funded by governments. And yet the results of the research remain largely behind paywalls: journals that require subscription fees often beyond the reach of the common man. Universities and labs can afford site licenses that allow all or most employees of the institutions instant access to the latest published research. But again, citizens outside of those institutions stay outside the paywall. They only get open access to internet-based science news services (EurekAlert, Science Daily, Phys.org) which dish out predigested summaries of findings – and then, only after embargo dates expire. Often, however, those summaries are tainted with bias to make the researcher’s institution look good.The thinking behind Open Science is that people who fund the research ought to be able to see the results. Some journals compromise by making all their publications publicly-accessible after a time period. Sometimes that is a year or more. Journals worry not just about their bottom line, and big hits to their operating expenses of peer review, illustration and publication, but to the process of science itself. Doesn’t peer review require adequate time to complete, and offer protection to both reviewers and authors? In the meantime, open-science journals (where the researcher pays to get printed), and online services like arXiv and bioXiv have made pre-publication research available for comment before peer review.It’s a scientific revolution, and Big Media is running scared.Radical open-access plan could spell end to journal subscriptions (Nature News). A graph in this piece by Holly Else shows the steady rise of open-access publishing. Her use of the word “radical open-access” underscores the fear: “Eleven research funders in Europe announce ‘Plan S’ to make all scientific works free to read as soon as they are published.” There goes the hefty subscription price to Nature, Science, and other big-name journals that have comfortably ruled peer-reviewed publications for decades.Major research-funding agencies from across Europe have unveiled a radical open-access initiative that could change the face of science publishing in two years. The ‘Plan S’ pledge requires that scientists make papers free to read immediately upon publication, under an open licence. Publishers were immediately up in arms about the plan: Springer Nature said it “potentially undermines the whole research publishing system”. The initiative is spearheaded by Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission’s special envoy on open access, who says the ‘S’ in Plan S can stand for “science, speed, solution, shock”.Proponents of open science argue that “Paywalls are not only hindering the scientific enterprise itself but also they are an obstacle [to] the uptake of research results by the wider public.”Every solution creates new problems. While the public might welcome the new transparency and access, free-world governments might worry about theft of intellectual property, or release of findings with dual-use potential (civilian and military). The situation might be compared to debates about free-speech rights to publish steps to making a gun with a 3-D printer. And what about free markets? But does the free market apply to dissemination of information paid for by OPM? (other people’s money). Subscription-paid access has dropped from 49.2% to 37.7% between 2012 and 2016, a graph in the article shows. Whatever happens, the Europeans are pushing a “bold access plan” that “could overturn science publishing as we know it” (Nature Briefing).Pirate paper website Sci-Hub dealt another blow by US courts (Nature News, Nov 2017). Last fall, Nature gloated that the courts prevented Sci-Hub from reprinting unauthorized papers from the American Chemical Society. ACS won a lawsuit, but the defendant Sci-Hub operates outside the United States. It may have been a pyrrhic victory. Nature acknowledges that thieves have workarounds to get past the paywalls on the internet.The smart trendmakers are trying to look more open and less selfish. Hoary old journals like Nature have initiated their own open-access journals (Nature Communications, Scientific Reports), and Science, published by the AAAS, has its open-access contender, Science Advances. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) offers some of its papers in open-access form. They’re all trying to join the bandwagon; they just don’t want to let go of their cash cows.Science without publication paywalls: Coalition S for the realisation of full and immediate Open Access (PLoS Biology). Here are the arguments by the crafters of Plan S for the “radical” open-access plan. And for anyone wishing to read it, the plan itself is published in one of the most successful open-access journals, Public Library of Science.Nobody knows what will happen, and we are not taking sides. People have a right to protect their intellectual property, and businesses have a right to compete in the free market, but there are gray areas here. Does the researcher own it, if it was taxpayer funded? Does the journal own it, because they provide a service to readers, including dressing up text for print and adding commentaries? Does the public own it, when they may have paid for the research, but not the work of formatting and dissemination? While we agree that “sunlight is the best disinfectant,” sunlight can also kill some beneficial things. The only clear lesson from this wild-west rampage is that scientific practices are not set in stone. Peer review, publication, and scientific methods must be adapted to changing circumstances. The internet is a huge recent circumstance. Raise your hand if you remember sitting in the library walking through stacks of journals after consulting the Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature. Are we better off now? Well, in some ways. Loss of control over intellectual property, particular information with dual-use potential, may have globally nefarious consequences. Navigating these rapids will require the best in human intelligent design. (Visited 459 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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All systems go at the SKA

first_imgStanding in front of their aircraft on the brand new landing strip near the SKA site in the Northern Cape, are (l to r), Prof Justin Jonas, Dr Val Munsami, Minister David Willetts, Sir Steve Smith, Dr Simon Berry, Tim Moody, Vinny Pillay and Tracy Cheetham.(Image: Janine Erasmus)One of the reasons that the SKA is located where it is, is because of the low population density in that part of the country, resulting in little or no radio interference.(Image: SKA)A view of the KAT-7 from the top of nearby Losberg, which acts as a barrier between the installation and the SKA admin and control site.Justin Jonas and David Willetts gaze out over the MeerKAT core. Foundations for the 64-dish telescope are already being poured and the first dish is expected to be installed by the end of the year.(Images: Janine Erasmus)MEDIA CONTACTS • Tommy MakhodeChief director, communications:Department of Science and Technology• Marina JoubertSKA South Africa communications+27 83 409 4254 Janine ErasmusIt’s all systems go at the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) site in the Northern Cape. There’s a brand new landing strip which will cut down on transport time to and from the site, and a whole host of new buildings going up. And there’s also the MeerKAT, the SKA precursor, which is under construction.The all-weather landing strip will eliminate a couple of hours of travelling time, because it saves people having to drive from the airstrip in Carnarvon – about an hour each way – which was previously the case. Getting new equipment in will also be a lot easier.It’s 1.3km long and 18m wide and is registered as a voluntary un-manned landing strip with the South African Civil Aviation Authority. It can accommodate 13-seaters and any smaller craft, but there is provision to upgrade the voluntary registration to a fully licenced landing strip, if larger aircraft should ever need to land.On 11 September the UK’s minister for universities and science, David Willetts, was part of a delegation that touched down on the landing trip for the first time. He was accompanied by Sir Steve Smith, vice-chancellor of Exeter University; Dr Simon Berry, SKA expert from the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council; and Tim Moody, second secretary for science and innovation at the British High Commission.While in South Africa, WIlletts signed an agreement with his South African counterpart Derek Hanekom, to strengthen collaboration between scientists in the two countries. The two ministers pledged their support for an initiative called the Scientific Seminar Scheme. Funded equally by both ministries, this programme will comprise a series of conferences and seminars that will bring together groups of early- to mid-career scientists from South Africa and the UK.“It’s very exciting to see sub-Saharan Africa leading what is going to be one of the big science experiments of the next decade, and it’s going to be a great boost for science in South Africa and across the continent,” said Willetts, adding that he was impressed with the amount and quality of work that had been done on the SKA, as well as the speed with which the local team was working.“Where we are will be the centre of the biggest science infrastructure in the world in a decade or so,” said Prof Justin Jonas, associate director for science and engineering at SKA South Africa. “Africa has already become a big hub for science.”Easier to get thereBuildings around the site, which were quite sparse originally, are now springing up everywhere. One of the most important is the new Karoo Array processor building. This will house all the data processing racks, as well as the power and back-up equipment, required for MeerKAT. Because it’s so important to keep radio interference to a minimum, much of the processor building, including the data rack room and control room, will lie 5m below the ground. In addition, the data rack and control rooms will be shielded with steel panels over the walls and ceiling.There will be 50 racks for MeerKAT and 80 for SKA phase one. “This is where the processing will be happening,” said Jonas. “The dishes themselves use relatively small amounts of power, but a lot of power will be going to the computers.”He explained that the data rack room has to be completely shielded to prevent radio frequency interference affecting the incoming data from the telescope, and that the joins between panels will be examined with a device called a sniffer to ensure that the room is secure. If it’s not, the entire facility will be rendered useless.The door alone will weigh 360kg and will be about 30cm thick. “The amount of force required to put the door in place is more than a person can muster, so it’s pneumatic.”The data must be processed on the fly before it’s sent back to the office in Cape Town, said Jonas, because it would be too expensive to store it or send huge amounts of raw data down a fibre cable – “It’s best to put the computers where the data is,” he said. “They don’t need to be in the big city. We’re talking about data bandwidth that’s equal to that of a small continent.”Another building that’s undergoing changes is the dish assembly shed. With its volume now more than double that of the original, the team can work on two dishes at one time. A pedestal integration shed is also nearing completion – this facility will allow for the addition of the pedestal and electronics, and pre-installation testing as well.The processor building is expected to be finished by March 2014 and the shed by the end of September 2013 – this is a must because MeerKAT dish construction is expected to begin soon.Building the SKAThe 64-dish MeerKAT will be completed in 2016, and will then be the largest radio telescope in the world – until the SKA overtakes it. The team expects the first MeerKAT dish to be completed and installed by the end of 2013.At the time of the site visit, five foundations had been poured. Laying a MeerKAT foundation is not the same as laying one for a building – it’s a complex structure that has to support a 19m-high antenna and keep it stable enough in strong winds to continue accurately gathering data, as well as protect it from lightning damage. Each foundation consists of 78 cubic metres of concrete and nine tons of steel reinforcement and has to comply with a set of rigorous quality standards.The MeerKAT telescope is estimated to cost about R2-billion (US$204-million), but, said Jonas, the total budget is about R3.9-billion ($398-million) because of all the other components, such as the highly successful human capital development programme.MeerKAT will be followed by the first phase of the mid-frequency SKA component, which will be located in the area where KAT-7 and MeerKAT stand, and will comprise the existing dishes plus an extra 190.“SKA phase one extends out for about 100km or so,” said Jonas. “It’s expected that phase one will go operational in 2018, or perhaps a bit later.”Phase two of the SKA will extend further out into the African partner countries, and will also see low-frequency components coming online in Australia and New Zealand.last_img read more

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A plan to move South Africa forward

first_imgOver the long term investment in infrastructure development is pro-growth because business can operate more efficiently when you fix overcrowded ports, potholed highways and other bottlenecks. (Image: Brand SA). Sulaiman PhilipSouth Africa’s Constitution is the structure set up to provide a level playing field. It compels the government to ensure economic parity and in so doing build a nation in which citizens can find meaning. The grand promise expressed in that document has raised expectations – ending poverty and discrimination – that could never be achieved in 20 years.We face three intractable challenges – high unemployment, poverty and inequality. The problem facing a developing economy like South Africa’s, caught in the wake of a shallow global recovery, is that tax revenue remains stagnant. This makes it difficult to find the funding for the nation’s grand design without increasing sovereign debt.There are subtle and direct social consequences to creating a stronger economy in a society with a growing inequality problem. It is accepted that inequality has a drag effect on economic growth. It causes wage stagnation, putting pressure on the middle class. Yet as the cost of a university education and the price of buying a home increases it becomes more difficult for people to move up into the middle class. Investment in a combined effort of infrastructure development and training programmes has been a proven path towards strengthening and building a middle class. Infrastructure investment is considered the most direct way to creating skilled, high-paying jobs.Inadequate infrastructure and the funds to build have constrained economic growth and the resulting social inclusion. Whether it is fulfilling the vision of the National Development Plan or building bridges, schools and roads, infrastructure has to be created to grow the economy, which has the effect of raising the standard of living in the country.Late in 2014 the International Monetary Fund (IMF) signalled an important change to thinking and policy. Instead of encouraging governments to embrace fiscal discipline they argued for an investment in infrastructure using borrowed money. More importantly, they argued, debt rather than cutting spending or raising taxes would stimulate growth faster.According to the IMF’s budgetary maths, every dollar of debt invested in new and improved infrastructure increased the economy by three dollars. Infrastructure building programmes – new and improved roads, new power stations and schools – boosts an economy in the short term by creating jobs. Productive workers spend their salaries, which in turn boosts other parts of the economy. The IMF is now arguing that debt as a result of spending on infrastructure programmes is the best way to stimulate economic growth. In South Africa it could help create highly skilled well paying work. (Image: Brand SA).The IMF added: “Over the long run, it’s potentially pro-growth too, because business can operate more efficiently when you fix overcrowded ports, potholed highways and other bottlenecks.” The Great SocietyIn May 1964, US president Lyndon Johnson described his vision of a Great Society in a speech at the University of Michigan. On that day Johnson called on citizens to join with the government to build a more equal society through education that gave all citizens a chance to rise in society and find meaning in life. He called for liveable cities built with the conservation of the environment in mind.In his speech Johnson explained that the country stood at the threshold, faced with building a great society, not just a rich or powerful society. He promised that his Great Society would be “a place where every child can find knowledge to enrich his mind and enlarge his talent… where the city of man serves not only the needs of the body and the demands of commerce but the desire for beauty and the hunger for community”.The speech that gave rise to a social safety net for America’s most needy through access to health care and housing. It also helped pull more Americans into the relative safety of the middle class through expanded public works.Richard Goodwin, the man who wrote the speech, explained that Johnson believed that rising wealth for a few did not liberate Americans to pursue the happiness their constitution promised. A more equitable vital economy was “the only possible direction for liberating, progressive change”. South Africa’s growth targetIn his most recent State of the Nation speech, given in 2014, President Jacob Zuma set a growth target for the economy of 5% by 2019. This target would be achieved through partnerships with communities and the private sector.He spoke of projects in the energy industry, Transnet and Prasa’s multibillion-rand rail projects, and housing projects designed to revitalise dying mining towns. Education and skills development would be prioritised to educate the engineers, doctors, plumbers and teachers the country needed to build the economy. And as the country became more urban, Zuma said, he talked of building new kinds of cities that were more inclusive, efficient places to live.“We urge all South Africans to work with us to make the implementation of these programmes a success. Together let us move South Africa forward.”Support Team SA at Davos on social media by using the hashtag #SAinDavos.last_img read more

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