NDSP investigates assault

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating a sexual assault that was reported Nov. 30. The reported sexual assault was committed by an acquaintance in a dorm on campus on Sept. 25. NDSP notified students in an e-mail to the student body Thursday. Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors can be found at ndsp.nd.edu and at the Office of Student Affairs website. To report a crime in progress, suspicious activity or other emergencies, call 574-631-5555 or dial 9-1-1 from any campus telephone.last_img

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ND celebrates Rare Disease Day

first_imgThe Center for Rare and Neglected Disease hosted a dinner featuring speakers from different projects centering on rare disease research to celebrate World Rare Disease Day. Dr. Katsuri Haldar, director of the Center, wants to raise awareness and funds to fight neglected disease. “There are 7,000 rare diseases, which means one in 150,000 people are affected,” she said. “There are 7 million Americans affected by rare disease and 200 million worldwide.” Haldar said everyone at the event now has the responsibility to go out and raise awareness about rare disease. “My charge to this group is to go out and be ambassadors in order to facilitate the process of rare disease research,” she said. Many different labs, as well as both undergraduate and graduates, attended the event. Mary Claire Sullivan, a first year MBA student at the Mendoza College of Business, became involved in rare disease research through an interdisciplinary class project that combined science and business. She helped take the research and what is happening in the lab and turning it into a business. Sullivan said her passion is to use business to create social change. “The body of knowledge and passionate individuals can make an impact for those people that have no hope,” she said. Aaron Patzwahl is an undergraduate student taking a clinical research class focusing on Niemen Pick Type C disease (NPC). The class analyzes patient data and creates a numerical value that can track the progression of the disease. “I got interested in the class through [Dean of the College of Science Gregory Crawford] and his bike trip this summer,” he said. “I thought it would be a way to take my science and do something move socially conscious with it.” Senior Nina Farivari took the clinical research class in the fall of her junior year. She became so interested in NPC that she worked in Dr. Forbes Porter’s lab this summer. Porter — of the National Institutes of Health — is currently running the only clinical trial of NPC in the country. “For me, it was a way to put a face and a family to the disease system,” she said. Farivari attended the national conference for NPC last August. Attending the lectures by the leading researchers in the field and getting to see the families outside a clinical setting were the best parts of the conference, she said. Katherine Byrd, a third year chemistry graduate student, is currently working on synthesizing biochemical tools to help study disease. She, along with other students, is using interdisciplinary techniques to find ways to study and someday possibly treat NPC. Emmanuel AduGyamfi, a chemistry and biochemistry graduate student, is researching the Ebola virus, a highly contagious disease with an almost 90 percent morality rate during outbreaks. “We use an interdisciplinary approach to try and understand how the proteins of the Ebola virus replicate,” AduGyamfi said. “Hopefully, we can use our findings for other kinds of rare disease.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s promotes international culture, abroad programs

first_imgSaint Mary’s will promote both international culture and study abroad opportunities this week as part of International Education Week (IEW), an annual program celebrated at colleges across the nation. The Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) and Department of Modern Languages will co-sponsor the week’s events, which began Monday with several lectures and a French dinner. Jill Long, the assistant director for CWIL’s International Student Scholar Services and Recruitment, said the week’s activities will promote an understanding of other countries and foster intercultural relationships. “The idea is to bring awareness to the Saint Mary’s campus,” Long said. “We want people to realize how small our world really is and how important it is that we are up to date with what is going on in other corners of the globe.” IEW features cultural presentations, discussions and panel presentations led by faculty and students for the College community, Long said. Dinners and lunches featuring international cuisine will also be served each day in the Noble Family Dining Hall. Long said she hopes the events will unite international and domestic students. “One of our goals is that people will feel more comfortable approaching our international students on campus and appreciate how much work and preparation they have done in order to study in the United States,” Long said. “[In particular, the International Cultural and Study Abroad Fair] on Friday [in the Student Center Lounge] will be a relaxed setting for people to enjoy music and dance from other countries.” Long said another purpose of IEW is to promote new study abroad opportunities Saint Mary’s recently added to its list of available programs. In addition to traditional programs like those in Ireland, Rome and Innsbruck, students can now study abroad in Morocco, China, France and at Oxford University in England. Additionally, Long said the College recently opened a new spring break option in Ireland. The events of IEW will educate students about these study abroad opportunities, Long said. “If you’re thinking of studying abroad, you can get a better of idea of what the program is like from someone who has experienced it that is your own age,” Long said. While some events are similar to those hosted during last year’s program, Long said CWIL and the Department of Modern Languages made a few adjustments this year to allow more student attendance and discussion. “We looked at event attendance from last year and tried to make them more accessible for students,” she said. “We wanted to make students feel more comfortable and feel like they are actually participating and that their questions are welcome. The goal is to open things up more so a dialogue starts that will continue throughout the year.” For a schedule of International Education Week events and updated study abroad information, visit the CWIL website at www.centerforwomeninleadership.orglast_img read more

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ND Minute visits the Social Concerns Fair

first_imgFrom schoolwork and service to clubs and co-rec sports, Notre Dame students have a lot on their plates. On top of those notoriously busy schedules, many students seek to strengthen the partnership between Notre Dame and the South Bend community by giving back through service. At last week’s Social Concerns Fair, students met with representatives from more than 60 student clubs and local service organizations to learn about the plethora of service opportunities available. A variety of options were available for a variety of students, including volunteering at the Center for the Homeless and building houses with Notre Dame’s Habitat for Humanity chapter. ND Minute caught up with presenters from both student clubs and community organizations to discuss their involvement in the Social Concerns Fair. We also chatted with a few students about their reasons for attending the fair and their personal interests in service.last_img read more

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Professors show off unique talents

As a way for students to interact outside of the classroom with professors, Legends of Notre Dame hosted the fourth annual ‘Professors Unplugged’ event Tuesday night. This event gives freshmen a chance to see their professors’ unique talents. ND Ignite, a program in the First Year of Studies, organized this year’s event to increase interaction between professors and freshmen, professor and event coordinator Sean Wernert said. “We planned and worked with them [the students] to make the event something that they can be proud of and informative,” Wernert said. “As we continue the event each year, we work with first-year students to remake and design the event as something that they will find interesting.” “We want students to see the path that professors have taken in their careers – what brought them to their chosen academic field and how they got to Notre Dame,” Wernert said. “We also want students and faculty to interact outside the classroom in an informal environment.” Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, kicked off the event by reading three personally written poems. The first of those poems, entitled ‘First Book,’ stressed the importance of embracing and examining self. “We are the first book we are ever given, but the one we read last and least attentively,” Page said. Following Dean Page, Abby Palko, professor of gender studies, chronicled her journey to Notre Dame, which included an eight-year stint as an 8th grade teacher. “When I finally went to Notre Dame for my Ph.D after teaching I couldn’t believe I was being paid to read,” Palko said. “It was incredible.” Many of the professors revealed musical talents. Professors Annie Coleman and Josh Kaplan performed a duet together with an ukelele and a trumpet. Sociology professor Eugene Halton impressed with his harmonica playing skills. His music style was varied, ranging from Beethoven on a miniature harmonica to train sounds on a traditional harmonica. Between songs, Halton recalled his time at Princeton as a track and field athlete and the road that led him to Notre Dame. Others, such as Professor Anre Venter, amused the crowd with wit and sarcasm. “My talent is to use ridicule and sarcasm as the basis for good teaching,” Venter said. “It is always done with love and respect.” Students who attended the event said they felt the event was a success. “I’m really glad I went,” freshman Sophie Loftus said. “They were all really talented and had great life stories.” Contact Drew Pangraze at apangraz@nd.edu,As a way for students to interact outside of the classroom with professors, Legends of Notre Dame hosted the fourth annual ‘Professors Unplugged’ event Tuesday night. This event gives freshmen a chance to see their professors’ unique talents. ND Ignite, a program in the First Year of Studies, organized this year’s event to increase interaction between professors and freshmen, professor and event coordinator Sean Wernert said. “We planned and worked with them [the students] to make the event something that they can be proud of and informative,” Wernert said. “As we continue the event each year, we work with first-year students to remake and design the event as something that they will find interesting.” “We want students to see the path that professors have taken in their careers – what brought them to their chosen academic field and how they got to Notre Dame,” Wernert said. “We also want students and faculty to interact outside the classroom in an informal environment.” Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, kicked off the event by reading three personally written poems. The first of those poems, entitled ‘First Book,’ stressed the importance of embracing and examining self. “We are the first book we are ever given, but the one we read last and least attentively,” Page said. Following Dean Page, Abby Palko, professor of gender studies, chronicled her journey to Notre Dame, which included an eight-year stint as an 8th grade teacher. “When I finally went to Notre Dame for my Ph.D after teaching I couldn’t believe I was being paid to read,” Palko said. “It was incredible.” Many of the professors revealed musical talents. Professors Annie Coleman and Josh Kaplan performed a duet together with an ukelele and a trumpet. Sociology professor Eugene Halton impressed with his harmonica playing skills. His music style was varied, ranging from Beethoven on a miniature harmonica to train sounds on a traditional harmonica. Between songs, Halton recalled his time at Princeton as a track and field athlete and the road that led him to Notre Dame. Others, such as Professor Anre Venter, amused the crowd with wit and sarcasm. “My talent is to use ridicule and sarcasm as the basis for good teaching,” Venter said. “It is always done with love and respect.” Students who attended the event said they felt the event was a success. “I’m really glad I went,” freshman Sophie Loftus said. “They were all really talented and had great life stories.” Contact Drew Pangraze at apangraz@nd.edu,As a way for students to interact outside of the classroom with professors, Legends of Notre Dame hosted the fourth annual ‘Professors Unplugged’ event Tuesday night. This event gives freshmen a chance to see their professors’ unique talents. ND Ignite, a program in the First Year of Studies, organized this year’s event to increase interaction between professors and freshmen, professor and event coordinator Sean Wernert said. “We planned and worked with them [the students] to make the event something that they can be proud of and informative,” Wernert said. “As we continue the event each year, we work with first-year students to remake and design the event as something that they will find interesting. “We want students to see the path that professors have taken in their careers – what brought them to their chosen academic field and how they got to Notre Dame,” Wernert said. “We also want students and faculty to interact outside the classroom in an informal environment.” Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, kicked off the event by reading three personally written poems. The first of those poems, entitled ‘First Book,’ stressed the importance of embracing and examining self. “We are the first book we are ever given, but the one we read last and least attentively,” Page said. Following Dean Page, Abby Palko, professor of gender studies, chronicled her journey to Notre Dame, which included an eight-year stint as an 8th grade teacher. “When I finally went to Notre Dame for my Ph.D after teaching I couldn’t believe I was being paid to read,” Palko said. “It was incredible.” Many of the professors revealed musical talents. Professors Annie Coleman and Josh Kaplan performed a duet together with an ukelele and a trumpet. Sociology professor Eugene Halton impressed with his harmonica playing skills. His music style was varied, ranging from Beethoven on a miniature harmonica to train sounds on a traditional harmonica. Between songs, Halton recalled his time at Princeton as a track and field athlete and the road that led him to Notre Dame. Others, such as Professor Anre Venter, amused the crowd with wit and sarcasm. “My talent is to use ridicule and sarcasm as the basis for good teaching,” Venter said. “It is always done with love and respect.” Students who attended the event said they felt the event was a success. “I’m really glad I went,” freshman Sophie Loftus said. “They were all really talented and had great life stories.” Contact Drew Pangraze at apangraz@nd.edu read more

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Saint Mary’s hosts annual Sophomore Parents Weekend

first_imgSaint Mary’s sophomores did not have to wait until fall break to unite with their families this year, as the College hosted its annual Sophomore Parents Weekend on Friday and Saturday.Sophomore Olivia Bentley said she enjoyed the tailgate and watch party, since it allowed her friends and parents to familiarize themselves with one another.“My favorite part was cheering on the Fighting Irish with my parents and fellow Belles,” Bentley said.Sophomore Nicole Popow said she got to spend quality time catching up with her mom, and she enjoyed the chance to talk face-to-face. “I enjoyed just being able to sit down and talk with my mom in person about things that have been going on in our lives,” Popow said.Bentley, who is from Baltimore, said she thinks parents weekends are valuable because she does not see her family often.“I think it’s very important to see my parents and family as much as possible,” she said. “Parents weekend allows me to stay connected with them and is a good excuse for them to come visit me here in South Bend.”Popow said Sophomore Parents Weekend also offered students a chance to show their families where they live during the school year. She said her mom enjoyed seeing where Popow spends most of her time.Bentley said she enjoyed showing her family her dorm room and the South Bend community. “I think being able to spend time with our family on Saint Mary’s campus is important because they are able to see the hard work we are putting in here,” she said.Sophomore Caitlyn Gibbs said she enjoyed reuniting with her family at her home away from home.“It’s hard being away from your family for so long, so any opportunity to see them is a blessing,” she said. “It also is a way for parents to show their support of their daughters’ college education. College is difficult, and it is always nice to be reminded that you have people in your corner.”Tags: Baltimore, parents, Sophomore Parents Weekend, tailgatelast_img read more

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Badin Hall hosts Conscious Christmas sale to support rural Nepalese

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Ann-Marie Conrado Students purchase fair trade goods from Nepal as part of Badin Hall’s Conscious Christmas event.Each summer for the past ten years, Conrado has brought Notre Dame design students to Nepal, where they work side-by-side with local artisans to create marketable products. Many of those products will be featured in the fair trade sale, Conrado said.“Art and design students here [at Notre Dame] travel there, work with the artisans, start to understand the kinds of techniques they use, how they make products and then they actually develop things that are much more attractive and appealing to people here or in Europe,” she said.The direct contact the women of Badin have with HOPE Initiative provides them with a unique opportunity to see the tangible effects of their work, Conrado said. “We founded this organization back in 2003, and it’s small — it’s grassroots — but I think it also provides a way for Badin to have such an immediate connection because there’s not a lot of middlemen, it’s not this big bloated organization,” she said. “They raise funds, and they see something happen with it.”Last year, Conrado said, the sale raised nearly $13,000, which went to building a playground at an impoverished school, now known as the “Badin Playground.” The HOPE Initiative seeks to remedy the issues and factors that keep children out of school, she said. Making school appealing is one of those challenges.“A lot of the problems are that for kids, there’s nothing stimulating and there’s nothing fun about school, and they really dread going to it,” Conrado said. “With funding from Badin and their support, we actually built a playground — and that’s incredible to me that that dorm and the ladies of that dorm and all their hard work now have a very physical presence in world.”HOPE Initiative also runs HOPE House, a small orphanage in Kathmandu that seeks to provide orphaned children with the love and support they would not otherwise receive in a country with no social safety net.“It’s small because we are really family-oriented, we are dedicated to this group of kids, and we are trying to give them a very different educational experience,” Conrado said.Previously held in Badin’s common space, Conscious Christmas will be held in the LaFun Ballroom this year due to the ongoing renovation in Badin. Though they initially saw the switch as a challenge, sophomores and signature events commissioners Alice Felker and Jackie O’Brien now view the location change as an improvement.“We’re hoping that because it’s in [the] LaFun ballroom we can get the average student who’s stopping by Starbucks to come upstairs, learn a bit about HOPE Initiative, shop around, grab some free chai,” O’Brien said. “It’s also giving more exposure to HOPE Initiative as an organization.”Felker and O’Brien said the sale is their most successful fundraiser every year. Felker attributed its popularity to the high-quality, unique gift opportunities.“The reason why we do it this time of year is so that students can buy presents for siblings or parents. And it will be doing two things: You’re giving to someone you love, and you’re also giving to these kids you don’t know — but who really need your support in a lot of different ways,” Felker said. “It’s a really great event in that sense — you’re giving twice, essentially.”Tags: badin hall, Conscious Christmas, Hope Initiative, signature event For the past nine years, Badin Hall’s signature event Conscious Christmas has supported the rural population of Nepal through HOPE Initiative, a charity founded by their faculty fellow, anthropology professor Ann-Marie Conrado. The fair trade sale will take place Friday from noon until 6 p.m. in the ballroom of LaFortune Student Center and features unique crafts from baskets to jewelry made by Nepalese artisans. “We [in the HOPE Initiative] basically work in education in some sense — how do we expand and create educational opportunities?” Conrado said. “Some of those are in the area of working with handicraft artisans, which is where the sale comes in.”last_img read more

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Civil rights activist, former Olympic athlete to deliver series of speeches

first_imgForty-eight years before former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick kneeled in protest of police brutality in America during a preseason game against the Green Bay Packers, John Carlos and Tommie Smith — who had just won bronze and gold medals respectively in the 200-meter race in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City — also staged a protest during the playing of “The Star Spangled Banner.”The two athletes raised their gloved fists throughout the anthem in protest of racial discrimination in the United States.In events spanning the four days from Wednesday through Saturday, Carlos — in his third visit to Notre Dame — has spoken and will speak about his protest 50 years later as part of a University initiative, “1968: A Movement in Time.” Lucas Masin-Moyer Former U.S. Olympian John Carlos meets with the media Wednesday. Known for his 1968 protest at the Olympic podium, Carlos will speak at several events spanning from April 4 to 7 to honor the 50th anniversary of his demonstration.Carlos met with members of the community Wednesday at the Notre Dame Center for Arts and Culture in downtown South Bend, will address faculty and staff at two separate events in Washington Hall on Thursday and will deliver the keynote address at “The Black Man’s Think Tank” — sponsored by The Wabruda — on Saturday in the Dahnke Ballroom.Carlos said 1968 represented a coming-together of various forces which helped spark his protest. “Apartheid was running rampant at that time, the Vietnam war was at that time, you had the stripping of Muhammad Ali’s awards and his belt at that time, we were still fighting for housing and all the things that America put out there for its citizens,” he said. “ … You might say it was a puzzle and my participation was just a piece of that puzzle in terms of dealing with human rights.”This protest, Carlos said, was in part motivated by advice Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave him months before the Olympics and weeks before King’s assassination in Memphis.“He said to me something that turned my life around and gave me focus in terms of what I’d been doing all my life,” Carlos said. “[King] said, ‘John, I have to go back and stand for those who can’t stand for themselves.’”Carlos said King described to him how to make an impact while still being peaceful.“My focus was to develop some sort of statement … where we were sending waves out throughout society because it was about a humanitarian issues,” Carlos said.Carlos said he saw the spirit of his and Smith’s protest in Kaepernick’s initial protests and subsequent activism.“The first thing I said to Mr. Kaepernick when I met him is that he is my hero, I admire him, I see myself in him, I think that he is a very learned individual, I don’t [think] he popped off and took a knee without a basis for it,” Carlos said. While Carlos said he warned Kaepernick about the initial reaction to high-profile protests, he urged him to stay the course and continue fighting.“I told him there will be dissent and people will walk away from him, but don’t worry about them walking away,” he said. “The game hasn’t changed, they walked away from me, too, but today they’re running and jumping over each other to sit down with me and get a picture.”These negative reactions to activist athletes, Carlos said, are evident with the recent charging of Philadelphia Eagles defensive lineman Michael Bennett with assaulting an elderly woman at the 2017 Super Bowl, despite no video evidence and over a year since the crime had allegedly been committed.“I don’t think Mr. Bennett had any ill harm or intentions of hurting that woman, I think that it’s an unfortunate situation,” he said. “I think they’re trying to blow the situation out of proportion based on who he is and what he’s standing for and the fact that he’s getting ready to come out with his new book. I think this is a tactic to break him down and slow him down, but society will realize he has a tremendous amount of support behind him.”In addition to being inspired by activist athletes, Carlos said young activists fighting for humanitarian causes as he had across the country made him optimistic about the nation’s future.“I think that we have far more people that have a clear mind for themselves today, they’re not letting the headlines lead their [thought] process,” he said. “ … A lot more young people are stepping up to the plate just as I did 50 years ago — I was 23 years old. You look at kids today, 15, 16, 17 years old making statements, that’s critical to society today.”Tags: 1968: A Moment in Time, Civil Rights, Colin Kaepernick, John Carlos, Martin Luther King Jr., The Wabrudalast_img read more

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Former College President returns to Saint Mary’s to teach courses in 2020

first_imgFormer College President Jan Cervelli will return to Saint Mary’s to teach courses in art and environmental studies in the spring of 2020. The announcement comes several months after Cervelli filed a civil lawsuit against Saint Mary’s, alleging members of the College’s Board of Trustees pressured her to resign and did not honor their settlement agreement with her.Donna Fischman, director of integrated communications, stated Cervelli has always been a tenured professor and will be fulfilling those duties in the spring semester. “Cervelli has been a tenured professor since she joined the College,” Fischman said. “Last fall, she resigned from her position as president but retained her tenure status. She is scheduled to teach art and environmental studies courses in the spring semester.”Kathy Reddy, a source close to Cervelli, confirmed her professorship with the College in September and said Cervelli had started negotiating with the College in August to teach courses during the spring semester. Posters advertising the ART 274 course “Introduction to Environmental Design” with Cervelli listed as the instructor were posted around the College’s campus Wednesday. The posters encourage students to email Cervelli at jcervelli@saintmarys.edu if they have questions about the course. Tags: Jan Cervelli, President Jan Cervellilast_img read more

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Two New COVID-19 Cases Reported In Cattaraugus County On Saturday

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) LITTLE VALLEY – Two new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Cattaraugus County on Saturday.The Cattaraugus County Health Department says the 38th case involves a male resident who lives in the northwest part of the county.The man, officials say, first became ill on Monday after having travel history to Buffalo for his employment.“He was tested (on Thursday) after being symptomatic because he has two family members that are healthcare workers,” said officials. The 39th confirmed case is a woman living in the northeast part of the county who works at a nursing home in Buffalo. She was tested negative for COVID-19 on April 22.“(She was) asymptomatic for the most part except for a dry cough,” explained officials. “She was retested on April 30 since testing was offered for healthcare employees, and her test results on May 1 indicated that she was positive for COVID-19.”The department has now begun a contact tracing investigation in both cases.No new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Chautauqua County on Saturday.last_img read more

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